thinking thursday.

mind Why are the arts the first things schools cut when budgets get tight? They should be the last. Girls need to read books about mighty girls. AND SO DO BOYS. I am trying to imagine what Tess’ sensory overload might be like for her. The author asks what it is about intellectual disability that we find so difficult: “Our advances, however, are still a work in progress. While it’s true that open bigotry is less common than it used to be, the absence of direct hostility is not the same as the absence of ignorance. The word ‘retard’ is common in the schoolyard and on our screens: while our taboos about difference shift with incredible speed, slurs about intellectual disability often get a pass. From the movies ‘Tropic Thunder’ to ‘The Hangover,’ from Rahm Emanuel to Ann Coulter, ‘retard’ still tends to be seen as edgy, not bigoted. Of course, the issues in question transcend labels: in the Houston restaurant, the word ‘special’ was used as an insult, which only testifies to the resilience of prejudice. Any word can be repurposed for contempt.” One of my favorite novelists is just simply a genius. body This look at what families around the world eat in one week is telling, not only in terms of quantity, but also that Western diets are full of food in cans and boxes, while others are not. I am going to attempt to veganize and gluten-free-ize this savory pie crust recipe this week. Veggie panang curry. Yes, please. And a yes to coconut rice, too. This fake Les Mis “vote for Anne Hathaway for...

your daily rock : focus your attention

 “To pay attention, this is our endless and proper work.” -Mary Oliver We are so distracted. Texting while eating. Checking email while talking. The list goes on and on. What does fully paying attention even look like anymore? Can you put down your electronics today? Love, (These beautifully painted rocks are created by Kim Mailhot, aka The Rock...

poetry wednesday : looking, walking, being

  “Looking, Walking, Being” -Denise Levertov “The World is not something to look at, it is something to be in.” — Mark Rudman I look and look. Looking’s a way of being: one becomes, sometimes, a pair of eyes walking. Walking wherever looking takes one. The eyes dig and burrow into the world. They touch fanfare, howl, madrigal, clamor. World and the past of it, not only visible present, solid and shadow that looks at one looking. And language? Rhythms of echo and interruption? That’s a way of breathing. breathing to sustain looking, walking and looking, through the world, in it.   With thanks to Michael Elta for pointing me to this poem. Photograph: “Walking Alone” by Albert...

your daily rock : detach from being right

  “Grasping at things can only yield one of two results: Either the thing you are grasping at disappears, or you yourself disappear. It is only a matter of which occurs first.” –Goenka Ask yourself these four questions when you are stubbornly clinging to being right: Why do you think you are so attached to being right about this situation? Why is being right about this so important to you? Doesn’t everyone have their own version of ‘right’? I wonder what would happen if you gave up your need to be right? Love,   (These beautifully painted rocks are created by Kim Mailhot, aka The Rock...

tuesday reads.

Tess and I finished Keeper last week–it was a complex book and one we loved reading together. At the end, we rushed up to bedtime early to see how everything turned out. There were moments of real knowing, real loss, and real suspense. Now, given her interest in physics and astronomy, we are reading (to my heart’s delight) a biography of Stephen Hawking written by one of the most important people in my life, my long-missed physics professor from Guilford College, Sheridan Simon. After that, we will go back to the author of Keeper to read her book entitled The Underneath. I am also beginning to re-read When Women Were Birds by Terry Tempest Williams next in my urge toward investigations of voice and loss. And I am dipping into a favorite book this week as I can: The Art of The Personal Essay. What are you...